Striving for a More Resilient and Liberated Self

Just before summer, millions of Millennials graduate from higher education in the hopes of securing a good job and a nice place to live. What kind of transition can they expect? Who will miss the fraternity and sorority parties? Who will lament about the halls of learning or playing a college sport? For better or worse, who will be unemployed, underemployed or disillusioned with their college diploma?

Alex is a motivational speaker and advocate for lifestyle skills and home safety training, a free-lance journalist, and the co-founder of the National Kids Construction Club. He holds a Master of Science in Real Estate from American University’s Kogod School of Business. Alex welcomes your questions and the opportunity to speak to your organization. He can be reached at ajboughton@optonline.net.

Alex is a motivational speaker and advocate for lifestyle skills and home safety training, a free-lance journalist, and the co-founder of the National Kids Construction Club. He holds a Master of Science in Real Estate from American University’s Kogod School of Business. Alex welcomes your questions and the opportunity to speak to your organization. He can be reached at ajboughton@optonline.net.

Securing a career path should satisfy one’s soul, but it can be difficult to achieve at the age of 21. Many Millennials feel discontented staying with one company. Their job and salary expectations may be set too high. Perhaps they didn’t explore enough employment options through internships or part-time jobs while in college. Maybe a trade school could have been more fulfilling.

New tech and startup companies continue to attract recent grads, especially since many have chosen to embrace millennial mores. For example, arrive to work at 11 am, go home by 8 pm and in between, work out at the gym. It grants a young professional the ability to follow his or her idea of a dream job. If our economy doesn’t deliver your “perfect profession,” are you willing to keep an open mind?

As for housing, who among the grads can afford to buy their first place? How many will lose their independence and remain with their parents in order to save money? Millennials prefer to rent and like uprooting over shorter periods of time, often to other states, causing a rise in the rental market. They have seen their parents’ homes not retain their values and aren’t so sure they like the idea of planting roots just yet. ­Developers seem keen on keeping pace with that trend, but it’s not just renting habits that have businesses trying to frantically keep up.

Millennials seem poised to drive major societal changes through technology and to make work environments more dynamic, but some things may be more difficult to forsake. Who will be prepared to age gracefully and adjust to existing expectations of their older colleagues? Do you want millennial trends to be a reality forever, especially after marriage and kids?

How many Millennials can easily transition to using their hands to create, build and fix things? Without life skills, expect more challenges. Our grandparents passed along self-respect and dignity through hands-on skills. They routinely knew how to grow vegetables, build things and sew clothes.

It’s been both a blessing and a curse for our generation to have access to so much technology to help us. While most of our parents encouraged us to go to college, they didn’t necessarily inspire the strength and conviction to perpetuate life skills learning at home and in schools. We come from all walks of life and graduate intellectually stronger. Instead of just using our education as a means to accelerate our incomes, shouldn’t we take extra care to find a fulfilling career while growing our lifestyle skills too? Enjoy time’s passageways; it will make for a more resilient and liberated self!